Author Topic: Speech memorization  (Read 535 times)

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Offline Syphon76

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Speech memorization
« on: January 20, 2014, 12:45:25 pm »
I have been sick this entire week and all of a sudden my teacher wants me to memorize a five minute speech in one night. Any tips on how I can quickly memorize it?
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Offline ★Panda★

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Re: Speech memorization
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2014, 12:54:52 pm »
I've taken a couple speech classes and honestly, five minutes isn't that bad. Speeches tend to go by really quickly, especially if its a subject you're interested in. What's the subject?

The trick to memorizing a speech is actually to just memorize small amounts, and then fill in the rest. Five minutes is probably the equivalent of pages of text, which is nearly impossible to memorize completely in any given amount of time, let alone a night. Instead, read the entire speech several times, and then take notes on the key parts. Use these parts as springboards to give more details and expand upon them. I know it probably sounds difficult, but trust me, this way is easier than trying to memorize an entire speech word-for-word. Plus, it sounds more natural if you allow yourself some leeway.

Oh I almost forgot, practice actually speaking it as much as you can. Reading something over and over in your head can only go so far. Our speech professor always instructed us to practice in front of a mirror, but I always felt weird doing that...so you can try to find someone to practice in front of, or just go somewhere you won't be disturbed and recite it to yourself. Good luck! <3
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 12:57:01 pm by Panda »
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Offline Syphon76

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Re: Speech memorization
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 03:56:44 pm »
I've taken a couple speech classes and honestly, five minutes isn't that bad. Speeches tend to go by really quickly, especially if its a subject you're interested in. What's the subject?

The trick to memorizing a speech is actually to just memorize small amounts, and then fill in the rest. Five minutes is probably the equivalent of pages of text, which is nearly impossible to memorize completely in any given amount of time, let alone a night. Instead, read the entire speech several times, and then take notes on the key parts. Use these parts as springboards to give more details and expand upon them. I know it probably sounds difficult, but trust me, this way is easier than trying to memorize an entire speech word-for-word. Plus, it sounds more natural if you allow yourself some leeway.

Oh I almost forgot, practice actually speaking it as much as you can. Reading something over and over in your head can only go so far. Our speech professor always instructed us to practice in front of a mirror, but I always felt weird doing that...so you can try to find someone to practice in front of, or just go somewhere you won't be disturbed and recite it to yourself. Good luck! <3
Thanks for the tips :D
It's the speech "The Ballot or The Bullet". By Malcolm X.
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Re: Speech memorization
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 05:52:26 am »
On another note (If the speech is done I'm sorry for wasting your time) don't worry if you got something wrong the audience wont notice unless you make it noticeable. remember. It's YOUR speech. YOU own it the audience DOES NOT know whats in it