Author Topic: Stand up Bassists?  (Read 480 times)

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Offline LoyalPyra

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Stand up Bassists?
« on: April 11, 2016, 02:02:06 pm »
I'm trying to find some stand up bassists so I can get tips on how to pick one out and tips for learning, got anything?
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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2017, 04:56:36 pm »
Uh yes that's me

I've played Classical bass for about 3 years, and I'm sure you'll like it-However I have to admit that playing stand-up is really expensive, there's rentals to use-My bass rental cost up to 80 bucks a year

But if you wish to buy one yourself It'll cost you up to 1,000-8,000 for a good/decent quality one depending on the supplier-Not to mention you'll need a bow (there's a French and German bow if I'm not mistaken) and a cake of rosin (which can also be expensive, the bow I rented costed about 60-70 dollars I believe)



I used a french bow, it's the easiest to use and I believe more common than the German bow

A bow is a tool used to play the instrument, it has many strands of horse hair that need to tightened and loosened after every use(you see that little screw at the end of the bow? you turn it to loosen or tighten)

You must rosin the bow (rosin is a type of tree sap used to lubricate the hair strands by melting it through repeated rubbing)

The rosin is rather important, because it helps the little course hooks grip onto the strings nicely-Which makes using the bow on the strings easy and giving your bass a smooth clear sound. The rosin will melt onto the strings as you play.

It is optional to use the bow (especially in Jazz), plucking is always required and you must have your thumb rested on the back of the neck, with your four fingers curled to the strings in a relaxed manner.

But if you're going to read sheet music (mainly classical) then you'll most likely need the bow. There is a certain way you hold your bow. You must know how to hold it right or else you'll hurt your wrist or get used to the grip too much-

Which will again, hurt your wrist and make it harder to transition to the right grip-This happened to me and it took a few months to hold the bow correctly as I was holding the bow incorrectly for over a year. Plus stand-up Bassists, Violins, Cellos, Violas, Conductors, and other musicians will not take your seriously if you hold your bow wrongly if you want to play with an orchestra/band or if you want to practice/show others your soon to be amazing bass skills



Here is the correct way to hold your bow, but since I used the french bow I'll give you some tips about that-

-BEFORE YOU EVEN TOUCH A FRENCH BOW, you'll first need to practice the grip so your hand will get used to it. I simply used a pencil with the TIPS of my four fingers laying on front of the pencil in a relaxed manner, with the tip of my thumb laying backwards near the eraser in a relaxed manner.


(do this with a pencil first)




(you can also do this if you wish)

The first time you do this it'll feel weird and hurt/ache, but do not change that position to something that makes you feel comfortable! your wrist will get used to the technique/practice-Do this for a few weeks, occasionally moving your WRIST (not arm) side to side like if you where using the bow. You may learn how to use sheet music during the period of time, and once you feel comfortable with the technique you may transition to the bow.

Sheet music is a little complicated (it took me about two years to finally read sheet music by itself). What helps is to learn the basic scales, but to learn the basic scales you need to know the four main strings-

E-With the lowest pitch and thickest string

A-Still low, but gets less thicker

D-Perfect pitch, balanced, nice thickness

G-Highest pitch, thin string, has the most notes (lots of hand shifting, where you shift to the top of the neck to the bottom in a quick manner)


(my attempt to remember the notes of the bass, yeah you shouldn't use this as a reference)

Probably the far I could go about that, I really recommend a teacher to help you out (legit it's been forever since I've played stand-up I play an electric Jazz bass now)

However the last things I'd like to cover is the actual parts of the bass, the way you hold a bass, and it's maintenance


(this shouldn't really need any explaining, the screws (or machine heads) are what are used to tune your bass, they're called pegs when your use violins, violas, and occasionally cello)

The way you hold a bass is simple, but very important just like the bow-You can sit or stand up, I honestly prefer standing up since I've been doing it for so long. And NO, you don't carry the bass, you let it's weight rest on your chest/lower adobeman with your knee left to support it from falling down. Your right foot is out and a little slanted so the bass can be pointing at the right direction (towards the right)







THE NECK SHOULD NOT BE RESTING ON YOUR SHOULDER, your plucking arm (the arm you use to pluck the strings) should be holding onto the neck at all times. You can rest your arm by letting the neck rest on your shoulder but honestly when you practice and play it looks rather unprofessional and lazy. Sitting down it basically the same as standing up.

As for the maintenance, you must make sure you keep your bass out of hot areas, it could melt the glue on the strings, ect. and your bass will become un-tuned (hot/warm or sudden temperature fluctuation will literally loosen the strings)

Keep it in a nice secure, dark room temperature area-Make sure not to get the bass wet (common sense), I recommend getting a case (fabric cases are the most common, some even come with wheels if you're lazy af like me but basses are heavy as shit)

Make sure to tighten the bow before use, and loosen it after to avoid the hairs from breaking (replacements are expensive)-Rosin almost everyday or before you play/practice..Never use too much rosin it'll clump up your bow, but it will melt eventually once you being playing.

I'd also like to inform you that rosin does get very messy and dusty around the neck and bridge (if you have allergies or live with someone with allergies make sure you be careful)-I shouldn't be too worried as it normally just sticks onto your bass.

Rosin tends to harden a lot (it's tree sap), so it can be hard to clean even in dust form. It won't really do much if you clean off the dust on the bridge, but it can end up on the strings and limit playing.

Hope this helped, and I'd recommend finding local orchestras/instructors if you want to learn how to properly play the stand-up bass

I'm a little rusty on the stand-up bass, but if I ever had the chance of playing I'll always take that chance-Amazing instrument

Also if you think that you can easily play stand up cause you've played electric I'd think again because now you'll be playing a fretless bass so good luck with that lol




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Offline LoyalPyra

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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2017, 06:28:48 pm »
-snip-
Thanks, I'll read over this in a bit.

Would you recommend renting over buying?

And I don't plan on playing with a bow.

Thanks for the info!
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 12:50:40 am by Ace »
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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2017, 10:44:44 pm »
-snip-
Thanks, I'll read over this in a bit.

Would you recommend renting over buying?

And I don't plan on playing with a bow.

Thanks for the info!

Renting if you're starting out for the next few years, but if you want to play in gigs/bands/ect. or play professionally, a bass you own yourself can be worth buying

Rentals are great, but sometimes end up damaged from pre use, and I've noticed that bass rentals are hard to come by-While buying a bass is easy

Overall I would recommend getting a rental, you just need to be careful not to damage it and pay for the fees every year

Are you planning on playing in a band? Jazz maybe?
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Offline LoyalPyra

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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2017, 10:53:59 pm »
-snip-
Thanks, I'll read over this in a bit.

Would you recommend renting over buying?

And I don't plan on playing with a bow.

Thanks for the info!

Renting if you're starting out for the next few years, but if you want to play in gigs/bands/ect. or play professionally, a bass you own yourself can be worth buying

Rentals are great, but sometimes end up damaged from pre use, and I've noticed that bass rentals are hard to come by-While buying a bass is easy

Overall I would recommend getting a rental, you just need to be careful not to damage it and pay for the fees every year

Are you planning on playing in a band? Jazz maybe?
I plan on forming a little group with a friend of mine who has a classical guitar and doing some covers on songs by The Ink Spots. So yes, I guess I can call it a band, a very small one.
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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2017, 10:59:59 pm »
honestly i want to start over the summer so that i might be able to play in high school i can all redy read bass clef for i am in choir and i am a bass
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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 11:07:53 pm »
-snip-
Thanks, I'll read over this in a bit.

Would you recommend renting over buying?

And I don't plan on playing with a bow.

Thanks for the info!

Renting if you're starting out for the next few years, but if you want to play in gigs/bands/ect. or play professionally, a bass you own yourself can be worth buying

Rentals are great, but sometimes end up damaged from pre use, and I've noticed that bass rentals are hard to come by-While buying a bass is easy

Overall I would recommend getting a rental, you just need to be careful not to damage it and pay for the fees every year

Are you planning on playing in a band? Jazz maybe?
I plan on forming a little group with a friend of mine who has a classical guitar and doing some covers on songs by The Ink Spots. So yes, I guess I can call it a band, a very small one.
Then I shouldn't worry about the bow like you said, practice plucking techniques (curled fingers under the strings to insure a clear pitch with the thumb placed snug on the back of the neck-Plucking finger is almost always the right hand, pluck with the side and tip of the index)

If you're starting out, try to put stickers on the notes where your finger should rest at-For example, two red stickers on the upper neck of the D string, where four or two fingers may rest (labeled as an F), Index and pinky

Practice beats with the foot outside the bass by tapping, helps keep the rhythm when you're lost, counting to yourself also works if you can't multitask

Getting beginner bass booklets really help, they have a lot of simplistic pieces to practice on (on your case, playing the bass should be extremely easy without the bow however it is still advised to practice relaxing the muscles in your hand)-Stress balls and daily practices help aid in that


I used this book, and it's helpful if you want to learn the basics of reading sheet music/ect., but I do have to mention that further into the book it calls for a bow but plucking the notes is still possible



« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 11:10:32 pm by BerryCake550 »
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Offline LoyalPyra

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Re: Stand up Bassists?
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2017, 11:13:29 pm »
-snip-
Thanks, I'll read over this in a bit.

Would you recommend renting over buying?

And I don't plan on playing with a bow.

Thanks for the info!

Renting if you're starting out for the next few years, but if you want to play in gigs/bands/ect. or play professionally, a bass you own yourself can be worth buying

Rentals are great, but sometimes end up damaged from pre use, and I've noticed that bass rentals are hard to come by-While buying a bass is easy

Overall I would recommend getting a rental, you just need to be careful not to damage it and pay for the fees every year

Are you planning on playing in a band? Jazz maybe?
I plan on forming a little group with a friend of mine who has a classical guitar and doing some covers on songs by The Ink Spots. So yes, I guess I can call it a band, a very small one.
Then I shouldn't worry about the bow like you said, practice plucking techniques (curled fingers under the strings to insure a clear pitch with the thumb placed snug on the back of the neck-Plucking finger is almost always the right hand, pluck with the side and tip of the index)

If you're starting out, try to put stickers on the notes where your finger should rest at-For example, two red stickers on the upper neck of the D string, where four or two fingers may rest (labeled as an F), Index and pinky

Practice beats with the foot outside the bass by tapping, helps keep the rhythm when you're lost, counting to yourself also works if you can't multitask

Getting beginner bass booklets really help, they have a lot of simplistic pieces to practice on (on your case, playing the bass should be extremely easy without the bow however it is still advised to practice relaxing the muscles in your hand)-Stress balls and daily practices help aid in that


I used this book, and it's helpful if you want to learn the basics of reading sheet music/ect., but I do have to mention that further into the book it calls for a bow but plucking the notes is still possible
Alright thanks, I'll check out some books from the library and look at guides online.
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