Author Topic: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?  (Read 247 times)

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Offline flurrin

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How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« on: September 29, 2016, 12:18:36 pm »
I wanted to know how people make music that can be heard on computer
I see people plugging in instruments or using programs
and im like wow how do you talented people do this

so my questions are
What do you personally do or have seen being done to make music that can be played back on computer?
what methods are easier/cheaper?
favourite software?

Maybe one day i'll have a proper go at it..
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Offline Pumpkin Spice Wrex

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Re: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2016, 12:22:41 pm »
On a PC, music is commonly made on a programme called Fruity Loops studio, it does cost money however.
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Re: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2016, 01:24:14 pm »
You might be able to plug in an audio cord and record with Audacity but IDK
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Re: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2016, 02:54:09 pm »
You might be able to plug in an audio cord and record with Audacity but IDK

I highly don't recommend this, Audacity was prone to corrupting stuff when I used it.

I used mango^3(I think that's what it was?) and I can't remember the other program right now, but I'll edit this later when I remember it.

Now I use garage band since it comes free with macs and stuff, plus it has a simple layout  :fox-:P:
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Offline Vlad

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Re: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2016, 08:55:04 pm »
I am close friends with few electronic music producers and have acted as sound engineer for one of them for his live performances, so I'm pretty familiar with this stuff.

There are a multitude of programs, software suites,pieces of equipment and methodologies available for everything from recording live music electronically to producing fully digital music entirely on a computer. Every producer has their own unique workflow and setup, sometimes mixing and matching equipment, software, and methods to get different effects. The best thing to do if you're interested is find something that works for you and start messing around with it- FLStudio and Apple's GarageBand are common programs that are simple to start with. I learned on Acoustica's Mixcraft 5, which I found pretty intuitive and versatile (though it's a paid program and I think they're on version 7 by now).

If you're interested primarily in electronic/synthetic music, it can be good to start by remixing existing songs- just load a track into your chosen software and start manipulating it. Play with filters and EQ, chop it up and move it around, layer your own samples and beats over it, use software to extract specific voices/instruments from the raw audio so you can manipulate them, that sort of thing.

If you're interested in recording music made on traditional instruments (guitars, keyboards, synthesisers, drums, etc) it is again best to find a piece of software that's compatible and start playing with it to find out what kind of things work best or how better to use the software. You may want to find someone who knows what they're doing with that kind of stuff to help you understand how to get everything hooked up and give you some tips.

In either case, experimentation and practice is the key factor to improvement. There are many free programs with just as much capability as some of the more costly professional stuff, but they tend to be less well-documented and have a steeper learning curve because of smaller user bases, so be careful of that.

My best advice is that you do some research on what kind of thing you'd like to do, find a program, maybe read a basic tutorial or two, and just start doing stuff until you have a good idea how it works and what sounds good. Like learning any new art form, it'll take a bit before you actually like what you produce, but if you enjoy it and you spend some quality time on it you'll get there soon enough.
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Offline flurrin

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Re: How do people make music that can be heard on the computer?
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2016, 09:21:24 am »
I am close friends with few electronic music producers and have acted as sound engineer for one of them for his live performances, so I'm pretty familiar with this stuff.

There are a multitude of programs, software suites,pieces of equipment and methodologies available for everything from recording live music electronically to producing fully digital music entirely on a computer. Every producer has their own unique workflow and setup, sometimes mixing and matching equipment, software, and methods to get different effects. The best thing to do if you're interested is find something that works for you and start messing around with it- FLStudio and Apple's GarageBand are common programs that are simple to start with. I learned on Acoustica's Mixcraft 5, which I found pretty intuitive and versatile (though it's a paid program and I think they're on version 7 by now).

If you're interested primarily in electronic/synthetic music, it can be good to start by remixing existing songs- just load a track into your chosen software and start manipulating it. Play with filters and EQ, chop it up and move it around, layer your own samples and beats over it, use software to extract specific voices/instruments from the raw audio so you can manipulate them, that sort of thing.

If you're interested in recording music made on traditional instruments (guitars, keyboards, synthesisers, drums, etc) it is again best to find a piece of software that's compatible and start playing with it to find out what kind of things work best or how better to use the software. You may want to find someone who knows what they're doing with that kind of stuff to help you understand how to get everything hooked up and give you some tips.

In either case, experimentation and practice is the key factor to improvement. There are many free programs with just as much capability as some of the more costly professional stuff, but they tend to be less well-documented and have a steeper learning curve because of smaller user bases, so be careful of that.

My best advice is that you do some research on what kind of thing you'd like to do, find a program, maybe read a basic tutorial or two, and just start doing stuff until you have a good idea how it works and what sounds good. Like learning any new art form, it'll take a bit before you actually like what you produce, but if you enjoy it and you spend some quality time on it you'll get there soon enough.
thanks lots to think about here
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